CLAWAR2007

singapore

10th International Conference on

Climbing and Walking Robots

and the Supporting Technologies for Mobile Machines

16-18 July, 2007

Singapore

SING

Robotics is an exciting field in engineering and natural sciences. Robotics has already made important widespread contributions and impact in industrial robots for tasks such as assembly, welding, painting, and material handling. In parallel, we have also witnessed the emergence of special robots which perform valuable jobs, in non-industrial environments such as in search and rescue, de-mining, surveillance, exploration, and security missions. The emergence of mobile machines, such as the climbing and walking robots, for these missions in un-structured environments, has significantly broadened challenges that must be considered by robotics research.

The purpose of the 10th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Mobile Machines (CLAWAR2007) is to provide a venue where researchers, scientists, engineers and practitioners throughout the world can come together to present and discuss the latest achievements, future challenges and exciting applications for mobile machines in general, and climbing and walking robots in particular. In order to benefit all participants, and also to maximize the interaction, the technical program of this conference is intentionally tailored to having relatively few parallel tracks. Each track will accommodate peer-reviewed articles dealing with theoretical, experimental and applicative works. In addition to the technical program, the conference will include several keynote speakers and a common poster session.


Honorary Advisor:

Khin-Yong Lam, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

 

General Chairs:

Ming Xie, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Steven Dubowsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Jean-Guy Fontaine, Italian Institute of Technology, Italy

 

Program Chairs :

M. Osman Tokhi, University of Sheffield, UK

Gurvinder S. Virk, University of Massey, NZ

 

International Advisory Committee:

Manuel Armada, Spain

Yvan Baudoin, Belgium

Karsten Berns, Germany

Philippe Bidaud, France

Bryan Bridge, UK

Chan-Hin Kam, Singapore

Krzysztof Kozlowski, Poland

Giovanni Muscato, Italy

Lakmal Seneviratne, UK

 

Local Organizing Committee:

Z. W. Zhong, NTU, Singapore (Publicity)

K. H. Low, NTU, Singapore (Workshops)

C. J. Zhou, SP, Singapore (Exhibitions)

C. M. Chew, NUS, Singapore (Technical Vists)

D. Hsu, NUS, Singapore (Technical Visits)

A. P. New, DSO, Singapore (Awards)

H. Y. Yu, DSO, Singapore (Awards)

 

Conference Secretariat:

Shirley, Soh Wei Ling

CLAWAR Conference Secretariat Office

Center for Continuing Education

Nanyang Technological University

clawar2007@ntu.edu.sg


PDF file 

 

Topics of Interest:

The interest in climbing and walking robots (CLAWAR) has intensified in recent years. And, novel solutions enabling very diverse applications in complex environments are emerging by means of significant progresses in various areas. Therefore, it is the aim of the CLAWAR2007 conference to welcome contributions of quality papers presenting new research, new applications, and new technological developments at the hardware and/or software levels for climbing and walking robots.

In general, the topics of interest for the 10 th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Walking Machines include, but are not limited to:

RESEARCH

APPLICATION

  • Autonomous CLAWAR
  • Tele-operated CLAWAR
  • Biologically-inspired CLAWAR Systems and Solutions
  • Innovative Design of CLAWAR
  • Modeling and Simulation of CLAWAR
  • Planning and Control of CLAWAR
  • Co-operative CLAWAR Machines
  • Intelligence and Learning for CLAWAR
  • HMI for CLAWAR
  • Innovative Actuators and Power Supplies
  • Innovative Sensors and Sensor Network
  • Positioning & Localization
  • Perception and Sensor Fusion
  • Guidance and Navigation
  • Legged Locomotion
  • Wheeled Locomotion
  • Hybrid Locomotion
  • Tele-presence
  • Virtual Reality
  • Planetary Exploration
  • Security
  • Emergence Rescue Operations
  • Surveillance
  • Reconnaissance
  • Education
  • Biomedical Field
  • Rehabilitation
  • Petrochemical Field
  • Inspection
  • Construction
  • Entertainment
  • Helping for the Elderly and Disabled
  • Manufacturing
  • Performing Robots
  • Personal Robots
  • Home Robots
  • Service Robots
  • Space Robots
  • Assistive Robots

From Micro to Nano and Swarm Robots

plenary-speakers_clip_image002

Professor Dr.-Ing. Heinz Wörn

Leiter d. Instituts für Prozessrechentechnik, Automation und Robotik

Universität Karlsruhe (TH), Engler-Bunte-Ring 8,

76131 Karlsruhe, Germany

Tel.: +49/(0)721/608-4006

Fax : +49/(0)721/608-7141

eMail: woern@ira.uka.de

 

ABSTRACT

Current research in Micro, Nano and Swarm Robots and results of the European projects MINIMAN, MICRON and I-SWARM will be presented. First, the design and the control of 5 to 10 cm³ sized mobile-microrobots with five degrees of freedom will be shown.They can handle miniaturized parts as for example an optical component or a biological cell with a size in the micrometre-area with an accuracy of 100nm under a microscope or a raster-electron microscope. Second, the design and the control of a 1 cm³-sized mobile untethered microrobot will be demonstrated. Here, the robot consists of five parts: the Piezzo locomotion module, the micro control unit, the communication unit, the navigation system and the micro gripper. The mobile robot can be guided and positioned in an arena with and accuracy of 5 micrometre and can be programmed and controlled over the wireless communication unit. Third, the design and the control of 9 mm³ sized micro-/nanorobots with 3 degrees of freedom will be presented. Robots vary widely in size, design, and purpose. There are robots smaller than an O2 telephone, while there are also robots that tower above any human. Their capablities grow with each year of international research and development. They can contribute to many different professional fields, from medicine to education The transmission of energy and the communication between the robots is realized via infrared. The robot controller is fully integrated and has limited functionalities. Via basic sensors communication functions and elementary rules and behaviours the microrobot can act in a swarm consisting of hundreds and thousands of robots. Future applications could be monitoring-, inspection-, exploring-tasks etc. of big areas or objects. Principal methods for swarm control , self-organiziation and collective behaviour of such an “insect-like swarm” will be shown.

ABOUT SPEAKER

Prof. Woern was born in 1948 and studied electronic engineering at the University of Stuttgart. He did his Phd thesis on “multi processor control systems”. He is an expert on robotics and automation with 18 years of industrial experience.

In 1997 he became Professor at the University of Karlsruhe for “Complex Systems in Automation and Robotics” and also head of the Institute for Process Control and Robotics at the University of Karlsruhe. Prof. Woern lead a group of about 35 scientists research in the field of robotics and the work focused on the areas of industrial robots, humanoid robots, medicine robots, micro and swarm robots.

(2)

Bipedal Humanoid Robotics and Its Applications

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Professor Atsuo Takanishi

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Waseda University

3-4-1 Ookubo, Shinjuku-ku,

Tokyo 169-8555, JAPAN

Tel:+81-3-5286-3257

FAX:+81-3-5273-2209

Email:takanisi@waseda.jp

Web:www.takanishi.mech.waseda.ac.jp

ABSTRACT

Even though the market size is still small at this moment, applied fields of robots are gradually spreading from the manufacturing industry to the others in recent years. One can now easily expect that applications of robots will expand into the first and the third industrial fields as one of the important components to support our society in the 21st century. There also raises strong anticipations in Japan that robots for the personal use will coexist with humans and provide supports such as the assistance for the housework, care of the aged and the physically handicapped, since Japan is one the fastest aging societies in the world. Consequently, humanoid robots and/or animaloid robots have been treated as subjects of robotics researches in Japan such as a research tool for human/animal science, an entertainment/mental-commit robot or an assistant/agent for humans in the human living environment. Over the last couple of years, some manufactures including famous global companies started to develop prototypes or even to sell mass production robots for the purposes mentioned above, such as SONY, TMSUK, ZMP, TOYOTA, HONDA, etc. Most of those robots have two legs for its mobility . On the other hand, Waseda University, where we belong to, has been one of the leading research sites on bipedal walking robot and humanoid robot research since the late Prof. Ichiro Kato and his colleagues started the WABOT (WAseda roBOT) Projects and developed the historical humanoid robots that are WABOT-1 and WABOT-2 done in the early 70s and 80s respectively. One of the most important aspects of our research philosophy is as follows: By constructing anthropomorphic/humanoid robots that function and behave like a human, we are attempting to develop a design method of a humanoid robot having human two legs to coexist with humans naturally and symbiotically, as well as to scientifically build not only the physical model of a human but also the mental model of it from the engineering view point. Based upon the philosophy, I and my colleagues have been doing researches on bipedal humanoid robots. In my plenary speech I will introduce the research philosophy of bipedal humanoid robotics, the design and the control of the robots and its applications collaborating with robotics companies .

ABOUT SPEAKER

ATSUO TAKANISHI is a Professor of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Waseda University and a concurrent Professor and one of the core members of the HRI (Humanoid Robotics Institute), Waseda University. He received the B.S.E degree in 1980, the M.S.E degree in 1982 and the Ph.D. degree in 1988, all in Mechanical Engineering from Waseda University.

His current researches are related to Humanoid Robots and Cyborgs, such as the biped walking robots for modeling human biped walking as bipedal humanoid robots WABIAN(WAseda BIpedal humANoid) series, the biped locomotors for carrying handicapped or elderlies as WL(Waseda Leg) series, the mastication robots WJ(Waseda Jaw) series to machanically simulate human mastication for clarifying the hypothesis in dentistry, the jaw opening – closing trainer robots WY(Waseda Yamanashi) series for patients having difficulties in jaw opening and/or closing, the flute playing robots WF(Wasada Flutist) series to quantitatively analyse human flute playing by collaborating with a professional flutist, the upper body humanoid robots WE(Waseda Eye) series whith emotionally behave like a human based upon the “Equations of Mind” including emotion, the anthropomorphic taking robots WT(Waseda Talker) series whitch mechanically speak Japanese vowel and consonant sounds, and the other themes related to his research area. Refer to www.takanishi.mech.waseda.ac.jp for more details.

He is a member of Robotics Society of Japan (a board member in 1992 and 1993), Japanese Society of Biomechanisms, Japanese Society of Mechanical Engineers, Japanese Society of Instrument and Control Engineers and Society of Mastication Systems (a major board member from 1996 to current), IEEE and other medicine and dentistry related societies in Japan.

He received Best Paper Award (Application) IEEE/RSJ IROS2003, JSME Distinguished Research Activity Award in Robotics and Mechatronics in 2003, the Best of Asia Award from Business Week Magazine in 2001, the Finalist of Best Paper Award in ICRA1999 from IEEE and RSJ in 1999, the ROBOMECH Award from RSJ and Japanese Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1998 and the Best paper Award from Robotics Society Japan(RSJ) in 1998.

 

(3)

Robots Walking Down Under

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Professor John Billingsley

MA(Cantab), Ph D(Cantab), C Eng, C P Eng, FIEE, FIEAust.

Professor of Engineering

University of Southern Queensland

Toowoomba , Queensland 4350, Australia

Email: johnbill@usq.edu.au

http://www.usq.edu.au/users/billings/

ABSTRACT

A move to inland Australia meant leaving the industrial stimulus of Portsmouth, where walking robots could be sold to the nuclear industry, and concentrating more on agricultural applications. Nevertheless a ceiling runner was successfully developed here (and shown on UK TV) and research is making strides on several other walking projects.

One impetus for precise vision guidance of tractors is the concept of ‘controlled traffic’, minimising the compressive ‘footprint’ of the vehicle on the growing zone. Could legged agricultural implements improve on best performance? Australian methods differ in ways that could make them more attractive than in Europe.

ABOUT SPEAKER

JOHN BILLINGSLEY graduated in mathematics and in electrical engineering from Cambridge University in 1960. After four years working in the aircraft industry on autopilot design, he returned to Cambridge and gained a PhD in control theory in 1968. He led research teams in Cambridge University developing early ‘mechatronic’ systems including a laser phototypesetting system which was the precursor of the laser printer and the ‘acoustic telescope’ which enabled sound source distributions to be visualised (this was used in the development of jet engines with reduced noise). He moved to Portsmouth Polytechnic in 1976, where he founded the Robotics Research Group. The results of the Walking Robot unit led to the foundation of Portech Ltd, which for many years supplied systems to the nuclear industry for inspection and repair of containment vessels. Other units in the Robotics group have substantial funding for research in quality control and in the integration of manufacturing systems with the aid of transputers.

In April 1992 he took up a Chair of Engineering at the University of Southern Queensland in Toowoomba. His primary concern is mechatronics research and he is Director of Technology Research of the National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture. Three prototypes of new wall-climbing robots have been completed at USQ, while research on a fourth includes development of a novel proportional pneumatic valve. A substantial project in the NCEA received Cotton Research funding and concerned the guidance of a tractor by machine vision for very accurate following of rows of crop. Prototypes of the system went on trial on farms in Queensland, New South Wales and the USA for several years. In production form, it was marketed (without great success) by a major US tractor manufacturer, CASE IH. Parts of the system, however, became the successful basis for interfaces between GPS guidance systems and the automatic steering of the tractor. Other computer-vision projects have included an automatic system for the grading of broccoli heads, systems for discriminating between animal species, systems for precision counting of macadamia nuts for varietal trials..

He has taken a close interest in the presentation of engineering challenges to young engineers over many years. He has promoted the Micromouse robot maze contest around the world since 1980. Now with Mark Phythian he has simplified the Micromouse contest to become the Bilby contest, appealing to eleventh and twelfth year school contestants. He has contrived machines which have been exhibited in the ‘Palais de la Decouverte’ in Paris and in the ‘Exploratorium’ at San Fransisco, hands-on experiments to stimulate an interest in control. Several robots resulting from projects with which he was associated are now on show in the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney. He was awarded the Erskine Fellowship, University of Canterbury, New Zealand, where he spent two months February and March 2003.

 

(4)

Climbing Robots for Nondestructive Testing: historical perspective and future trends

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Professor Bryan Bridge

Co-Director, Research Centre for Automated and Robotic NDT

Faculty of Engineering, Science and the Built Environment

London South Bank University, TWI, CLAWAR Ltd, UK

Tel: +44 (0)20 7815 7501

Mobile: +44 7913 391093

Email: bridgeb@lsbu.ac.uk

 

ABSTRACT

It is perhaps not well known that mobile robots were already deployed in Nondestructive Testing (NDT) in the early 1970’s, well before fixed robots came into use on manufacturing plant. The need for NDT robots first arose with the growth in exploitation of the world’s oil and gas supplies. Vast length of pipeline are involved in transporting these supplies from source to multiple destinations. Sediment and chemicals in the unrefined products cause rapid cause inner wall thinning from both erosion and chemical attack. Pipe rupture at just one point, anywhere along a pipe can cause a major environmental disaster so there was always a need to inspect complete lengths of long runs of pipe. The handling of inspection sensors by human operators would thus always involve vast and costly numbers of personnel. This situation begged for sensor handling by mobile robot. A second reason for robotic deployment arose from the fact that many pipelines were buried underground, under concrete or ran along the sea bed before rising to the surface (risers). Human placement of sensors is impossible in these cases.

ABOUT SPEAKER

Professor Bryan Bridge was born in 1941 and graduated in physics at the University of Leeds, where he also was a research student in low temperature physics. From 1965 until 1989 he was successively assistant lecturer, lecturer and Senior Lecturer in Physics at Brunel University. In 1989 he became Professor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and Head of the Department of the same name at the now London South Bank University. Subsequently he became in turn, Head of the School of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, The School of Engineering and Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Science and Technology until 2003. Since then he devoted all his working time to personal research and research management. Whilst at Brunel, with the late Dr Jack Blitz, he was co-pioneer of the world’s first MSc Course in Non Destructive Testing of Materials This course attracted students from all round the world, funded by the British Council, the International Atomic Energy Authority, National Atomic energy authorities, and many governmental Defence Agencies. In parallel with managing this course, he became active as an NDT consultant with numerous clients over many years. His early research involved many aspects of the properties of advanced materials including ultrasonic characterization at extremes at high and low temperature. This involved the development of complex instrumentation as well as theoretical modeling. As an example he pioneered a technique for three dimensional imaging of thick, opaque, underwater off shore oil structures with single sided access only. This was based on Cobalt 60 Compton Scatter Imaging. For this work in 1990 he was awarded a Higher Doctorate (DSc) for a collection of 126 papers entitled ‘Non Destructive Characterisation of Materials. In 1992, at South Bank he founded the Research Centre for Automated and Robotic Nondestructive Testing (RCART) of which he is still Co-Director. with Dr T. P. Sattar. He has published over 300 papers, the majority in refereed physics and engineering journals and been awarded 63 personal research grants of cumulative value exceeding £9Million.He is a Fellow of 4 professional bodies: The institute of Physics, The British Institute of NDT of which he is a Technical Committee Member and former Council Member, The Institution of Electrical Engineers and the Royal Society of Art, Design and Manufactures. He is an Editorial Board Member two journal: Insight, the journal of the British Institute of NDT and Non Destructive Testing and Evaluation (Taylor and Francis).Presently he is Co-Director of RCART, Research Director of CLAWAR Ltd, European Projects Director at KCC Computer Consultancy ( London) and Consultant in the NDT Technology Group at TWI Ltd ( Cambridge).

(5)

Biomechanics and Robotics

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Neville Hogan

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and

Professor of Brain & Cognitive Sciences

Full Contact details:

Mechanical Engineering

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

77 Massachusetts Avenue

Cambridge, MA 02139-4307, USA

Tel: +1 617 253 2277

Email: neville@mit.edu

 

ABSTRACT

Robots are well on their way to becoming commonplace domestic appliances but to realize their true potential requires the perfection of contact robotics, machines that physically cooperate with humans. One pioneering application requiring close physical cooperation between robots and humans is the delivery of physiotherapy to facilitate recovery after orthopedic and especially neurological injury. However, controlling robots to interact effectively with humans presents unique challenges. A quantitative knowledge of human motor and sensory performance is important to optimize machines for human contact. I will briefly review our success with robotic treatment of upper-limb motor disorders and how it has profited from the availability of relatively detailed quantitative knowledge of unimpaired biomechanics and neural control of arm movement.

Robotic treatment of lower-limb motor disorders presents unique challenges as the control of locomotion is substantially more difficult and less well understood. On the engineering side, locomotion presents far greater challenges than arm movement. The dynamic process is fundamentally nonlinear, including prominent discontinuities. It is a hybrid dynamic system, switching between regimes governed by different dynamic equations. Add to these the paramount challenge of safely managing physical contact and interaction with frail human subjects. On the biological side, the relative importance of centrally-specified limb trajectories and semi-autonomous peripheral neural oscillators such as the putative locomotor pattern generator remains unclear. Furthermore, while dynamics is largely subordinated to kinematic goals in upper-limb motor behavior, musculo-skeletal mechanics appears to play a central role in controlling the lower limbs.

However, the relative importance of musculo-skeletal mechanics suggests that minimal actuation may provide substantial control authority; motors at every joint are almost certainly unnecessary. While this has obvious advantages for minimally-encumbering machine design, it makes the control problem even more difficult as the system is underactuated. I will discuss our initial investigations of the feasibility of controlling locomotion and assisting its recovery using distal actuation, in particular a two degree-of-freedom robot interacting with the ankle.

ABOUT SPEAKER

Neville Hogan is Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is Director of the Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation and a founder and director of Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc., a company offering innovative robotic tools to study and treat neuro-motor impairments. Born in Dublin, Ireland, he obtained a Dip. Eng. (with distinction) from Dublin Institute of Technology and M.S., M.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Following industrial experience in engineering design, he joined MIT¡¯s school of Engineering faculty in 1979 and has served as Head and Associate Head of the MIT Mechanical Engineering Department¡¯s System Dynamics and Control Division. He has been awarded Honorary Doctorates from the Delft University of Technology and the Dublin Institute of Technology and the Silver Medal of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland.

(NOTE: Due to the health, it is not wise for Professor Hogan to travel over long distance.

As a result, this talk will be substituted by the following one)

A Road from Walking Machines to Surgical Robots:

Digital Mechatronics

Professor Dr. Steven Dubowsky
Field and Space Robotics Laboratory, Room 3-469
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge, MA 02139
Email: dubowsky@mit.edu

Abstract:

Digital mechatronic devices approximate the motion of continuous mechanisms by using a larger numbers of binary Degrees-of-Freedom. Digital mechatronic devices have excellent repeatability, are reliable, robust and are simple to control. Artificial muscle actuators that are made of elastomers are ideally suited digital mechatronic devices. These actuators have unique properties such as very large strain and large forces. They are light and inexpensive.

In the work presented here digital mechatronic systems were first considered for planetary exploration walking robots.  This study has lead to the development of surgical robots that can function effectively inside of MRI systems with important medical benefits.

***************

Dr. Dubowsky is a Professor Departments in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.  He is the director of MIT Field and Space Robotics Laboratory (http://robots.mit.edu/).. He is the Principal Investigator of a number of research programs sponsored by organizations that include DARAP, NASA, The US Navy, The Center For the Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology, industry, the Japanese Space Agency and the British government.  The research of these programs focus on the design and control of robotic systems.  Dr. Dubowsky has published over 300 technical and he is a Fellow of the ASME and of the IEEE.


 

Full Papers:

If a submission is accepted as a full paper, the length of the final version will be limited to a maximum ofeight (8) ten (10) pages.

Short Papers:

If a submission is accepted as a short paper, the length of the final version will be limited to a maximum offour (4) six (6) pages.

Invited Papers:

Proposals for invited sessions, each having 6-7 papers with full contact details of the corresponding authors, should be submitted by the proposer via the conference’s website. Invited papers can be submitted through the normal process of regular paper submission, with an indication that the paper is for an invited session.

Exhibitions:

Prospective exhibitors, participants of climbing robot competition and the pre-conference workshop(s) should follow relevant instructions on the conference website.

Instructions to Authors:

The official language of the conference is English and prospective authors are kindly requested to prepare their full papers according to the provided LaTeX template file or Word template file .

Please take note that:

  1. The final versions of the FULL papers shouldn’t be longer than eight (8) ten (10) pages.
  2. The final versions of the SHORT papers shouldn’t be longer than four (4) six (6) pages.

Once the paper is ready, please convert it to PDF format. The accepted papers, of which the authors have made the registrations and will present at the conference, will be published in the conference proceedings.

Manuscript Upload:

To submit a paper, click on the link below:

http://www.softconf.com/start/clawar07/submit.html


Prizes & Awards:

  • Best Conference Paper in the category of “Climbing Robots” (S$500)

  • Best Student Paper in the category of “Walking Robots” (S$500)

  • Best Conference Paper in the category of “Supporting Technologies ” (S$500)

 

Special Journal Issue:

CLAWAR2007 will invite the authors of top papers presented in the conference to submit the extended versions of their papers, which will be reviewed and published in special issues of learned journals.


 

International Program Committee:

A K M Azad, USA

A T de Almeida, Portugal

K Althoefer, UK

R Arkin, USA

C Balaguer, Spain

D P Barnes, UK

B Bell

J Billingsley, Australia

C Bostater, USA

K Bouazza-Marouf , UK

M Buehler, USA

G Bugmann, UK

S Cameron, UK

C Chevallerau, France

H Cruse, Germany

S Cubero, Australia

J S Dai, UK

B Davies, UK

R Dillmann, Germany

L Fortuna, Italy

T Fukuda, Japan

P González de Santos, Spain

S S Ge, Singapore

Z Gong, China

V Gradetsky, Russia

A Halme, Finland

R Hasselvander, France

E Herrera, Colombia

N Heyes, UK

S Hirose, Japan

M. A. Hossain, UK

D Howard, UK

O Kaynak, Turkey

P Kiriazov, Bulgaria

P Kopacek, Austria

K. Kwok, Singapore

D Lefeber, Belgium

J Lopez-Coronado, Spain

L Ma, China

C Melhuish, UK

R Molfino, Italy

N K M’Sirdi, France

D E Okhotsimsky, Russia

E Dupuis, Canada

H R Pota, Australia

W-Y Qiang, China

R Quinn, USA

M Ribeiro, Portugal

J Sa da Costa, Portugal

M A Salichs, Spain

T P Sattar, UK

M. H. Shaheed, UK

G. Seet, Singapore

M Shamsudin, Malaysia

L Steinicke, Belgium

K Tanie, Japan

A Vitko, Slovakia

K J Waldron, USA

R Walker, UK

H Wörn, Germany

A Yigit, Kuwait

A Zomaya, Australia


 

Program Overview :

(Final program)

Time

16 July 2007

17 July 2007

18 July 2007

8:30 – 8:45

Opening Session
(Venus 1)

Briefing Session
(Venus 1)

Briefing Session
(Venus 1)

8:45 – 9:30

Plenary Talk 1
(Venus 1)

Plenary Talk 2
(Venus 1)

Plenary Talk 3
(Venus 1)

9:30 – 10:00

Tea Break
Foyer of Venus Ballroom

Tea Break
Foyer of Venus Ballroom

Tea Break
Foyer of Venus Ballroom

10:00 – 12:40

M11
Session
(Venus 1)

M12
Session
(Venus 3)

T11
Session
(Venus 1)

T12
Session
(Venus 3)

W11
Session
(Venus 1)

12:40 – 13:45

Lunch
(Venus 2)

Lunch
(Venus 2)

Lunch
(Venus 2)

13:45 – 14:30

Plenary Talk 5
(Venus 1)

Exhibition
(Foyer)

Plenary Talk 4
(Venus 1)

14:30 – 15:00

Tea Break
Foyer of Venus Ballroom

Tea Break
Foyer of Venus Ballroom

Tea Break
Foyer of Venus Ballroom

15:00 – 16:40

M21
Session
(Venus 1)

M22
Session
(Venus 3)

T21
Session
(Venus 1)

 

T22
Session
(Venus 3)

W21
Session
(Venus 1)

W22
Session
(Venus 3)

16:40 – 17:40

16:40 – 17:40
Farewell Reception
(Foyer)

18:30 – 20:30

End of Day 1

Awards Banquet
(Mercury Ballroom)
(At Level 5)

End of Conference

End of Day 2

 


Advance Program:

Monday, 16 July, Morning

8:30 – 8:45
Opening Speech by the Chair of the School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, NTU

Venus I

8:45 – 9:30
Plenary Talk 1: Bipedal Humanoid Robot and Its Applications
Speaker: Professor Atsuo Takanishi
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Osman Tokhi

9:30 – 10:00
Tea Break

10:00 – 12:40
M11 Session: Climbing Robots (1)
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Osman Tokhi

10:00 – 10:20
A SLIDING SOCK LOCOMOTION MODULE FOR A RESCUE ROBOT
(Luca Rimassa, Matteo Zoppi and Rezia Molfino)

10:20 – 10:40
ROBOTRAIN AS SNAKELIKE ROBOTIC SYSTEM WITH MINIMAL NUMBER OF DOF
(Vladimir Pavlovsky, Natalia Petrovskaya, Vladimir Evgrafov and Vladimir Pavlovsky, Jr)

10:40 – 11:00
DEVELOPMENT OF A CLIMBING ROBOT FOR WELD INSPECTION
(Jianzhong Shang, Bryan Bridge, Tariq Sattar, Shymal Mondal and Alina Brenner)

11:00 – 11:20
DESIGN OF A NEW LEG MECHANISM FOR THE WHEELED WALL CLIMBING ROBOT
(Hejin Yang, Yili Fu, Zhihai Li and Shuguo Wang)

11:20 – 11:40
INTELLIGENT SPIDER WALKING ROBOT FOR ROUGH TERRAIN
(Michael McCready, Liqiong Tang and Gurvinder Singh Virk)

11:40 – 12:00
ON THE DESIGN OF A FOUR-BAR MECHANISM FOR OBSTACLES CLIMBING WHEELS
(Antonio González, Erika Ottaviano and Marco Ceccarelli)

12:00 – 12:20
THE CONTROL OF QUADRUPED WALKING ROBOT BASED ON BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED APPROACH
(Choi Hyouk Ryeol, Kang Tae Hun, Koo Ig Mo and Song Young Kuk)

12:20 – 12:40
SERVICING SOLAR POWER PLANTS WITH WALLWALKER
(Ridha Azaiz)

10:00 – 12:40
M12 Session: Walking Robots (1)
Venue: Venus III
Session Chair: Atsuo Takanishi

10:00 – 10:20
USING VIRTUAL MODEL CONTROL AND GENETIC ALGORITHM TO OBTAIN STABLE BIPEDAL WALKING GAIT THROUGH OPTIMIZING THE ANKLE TORQUE
(Van-Huan Dau, Chee-Meng Chew and Aun-Neow Poo)

10:20 – 10:40
THINKING ABOUT BOUNDING AND GALLOPING USING SIMPLE MODELS
(Kenneth Waldron, Joaquin Estremera, Paul Csonka and Surya Singh)

10:40 – 11:00
RESEARCH ON UNDERACTUATED DYNAMICAL WALKING OF 3D BIPED ROBOT
(Sheng Tao and Ma Hongxu)
11:00 – 11:20
MOVEMENT SIMULATION FOR MERO MODULAR WALKING ROBOT
(Ion Ion, Ion Simionescu, Adrian Curaj and Alexandru Marin)

11:20 – 11:40
DETECTING SOUND SOURCES WITH THE HUMANOID ROBOT RH-1
(Pavel Staroverov, Ricardo Martinez, Dmitry Kaynov, Mario Arbulu, Luis Cabas and Carlos Balaguer)

11:40 – 12:00
CONSTRAINT BASED TRAJECTORY SIMPLIFICATION OF FULL BODY TRAJECTORIES FOR A WALKING ROBOT  (Hanns Tappeiner and Alfred Rizzi)

12:00 – 12:20
DESIGN AND PROBLEMS OF A NEW LEG-WHEEL WALKING ROBOT
(Cristina Tavolieri, Erica Ottaviano, Marco Ceccarelli and Andrea Nardelli)

12:20 – 12:40
A PROPOSAL FOR BIPEDAL LOCOMOTION USING GYROSCOPIC EFFECT
(Pulkit Kapur, Rahul Mukhi and Vinayak)

12:40 – 13:45
Lunch
(Venus II)

Monday, 16 July, Afternoon

13:45 – 14:30
Plenary Talk 5: A Road from Walking Machines to Surgical Robots: Digital Mechatronics
Speaker: Professor Steven Dubowsky
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Kenneth J. Waldron

14:30 – 15:00
Tea Break

15:00 – 17:40
M21 Session: Supporting Technologies (1)
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Giovanni Muscato

15:00 – 15:20
A MODULAR APPROACH FOR CONTROLLING MOBILE ROBOTS (Kristian Regenstein, Thilo Kerscher, Clemens Birkenhofer, Tamim Asfour, J. Marius Zöllner and Rüdiger Dillmann)

15:20 – 15:40
AN APPROACH TO GLOBAL LOCALIZATION PROBLEM USING MEAN SHIFT ALGORITHM
(Giovanni Muscato and Salvatore Sessa)

15:40 – 16:00
CREATING A GESTURE RECOGNITION SYSTEM BASED ON SHIRT SHAPES
(Pavel Staroverov, Silvia Marcos, Dmtry Kaynov, Mario Arbulu, Luis Cabas and Carlos Balaguer)

16:00 – 16:20
DESIGNING OF A COMMAND SHAPER USING MULTI-OBJECTIVE PARTICLE SWARM ALGORITHM FOR VIBRATION CONTROL OF A SINGLE-LINK FLEXIBLE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM
(M. S. Alam, M. O. Tokhi and M. A. Hossain)

16:20 – 16:40
PERFORMANCE METRICES FOR IMPROVING HRI
(Yiannis Gatsoulis and Gurvinder Singh Virk)

16:40 – 17:00
SPARBOT – A ROBOTIC FOCUS MITT TRAINING PLATFORM
(Richard Stokes, Liqiong Tang and Ibrahim A. Al-Bahadly)

17:00 – 17:20
PARALLEL PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION FOR NETWORKED CLAWAR SYSTEM COOPERATION
(Fabio P. Bonsignorio)

17:20 – 17:40
GA TUNED COLSED-LOOP CONTROL OF SPRING BRAKE ORTHOSIS
(M S Huq, R Massoud, M S Alam and M O Tokhi)

15:00 – 17:40
M22 Session: Climbing Robots (2)
Venue: Venus III
Session Chair: Manuel Armada

15:00 – 15:20
KINEMATICS, SENSORS AND CONTROL OF THE FULLY AUTOMATED FACADE CLEANING ROBOT SIRIUSC FOR THE FRAUNHOFER HEADQUARTERS BUILDUNG, MUNICH
(Norbert Elkmann, Mario Lucke, Tino Krüger and Thomas Stürze)

15:20 – 15:40
GAIT PARAMETER ADAPTATION TO ENVIRONMENTAL PERTURBATIONS IN QUADRUPEDAL ROBOTS
(Elena Garcia, Joaquin Estremera, Pablo Gonzalez de Santos and Manuel Armada)

15:40 – 16:00
ON FOUR LEGS TOWARDS FLEXIBLE AND FAST LOCOMOTION
(Cem Kara, Christian Heckhoff, Thorsten Brandt and Dieter Schramm)

16:00 – 16:20
PATH PLANNING FOR THE “3DCLIMBER”
(Mahmoud Tavakoli, Lino Marques and Aníbal T. de Almeida)

16:20 – 16:40
TERRAIN-ADAPTIVE LOCOMOTION OF A WHEEL-LEGGED SERVICE ROBOT USING
ACTUATOR-BASED FORCE MEASUREMENTS
(Petri Virekoski and Ilkka Leppänen)

16:40 – 17:00
DEVELOPMENT OF AN AMPHIBIOUS HEXAPOD ROBOT BASED ON A WATER STRIDER
(Soh Fujii and Taro Nakamura)

17:00 – 17:20
A WHEELED WALL-CLIMBING ROBOT WITH TWO CLIMBING LEGS
(Zhihai Li, Yili Fu, Hejin Yang and Shuguo Wang)

17:20 – 17:40
A CPG WITH FORCE FEEDBACK FOR A STATICALLY STABLE QUADRUPED GAIT
(Jose Cappelletto, Pablo Estevez, Gerardo Fernandez-Lopez and Juan Carlos Grieco)

 

 

Tuesday, 17 July, Morning

8:30 – 8:45
Briefing by CLAWAR Association
Venus I

8:45 – 9:30
Plenary Talk 2: Robots Walking Down Under
Speaker: Professor John Billingsley
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Gurvinder Virk

9:30 – 10:00
Tea Break

10:00 – 12:40
T11 Session: Walking Robots (2)
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: John Billingsley

10:00 – 10:20
A HOPPING MOBILITY CONCEPT FOR A ROUGH TERRAIN SEARCH AND RESCUE ROBOT (Steven Dubowsky, Jean-Sebastien Plante, Sam Kesner and Penny Boston)

10:20 – 10:40
A STEP TOWARDS PNEUMATICALLY ACTUATED BIPED LOCOMOTION : A BIO INSPIRED PLATFORM FOR STIFFNESS CONTROL
(Giovanni Muscato and Giacomo Spampinato)

10:40 – 11:00
USING OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES FOR THE DESIGN AND CONTROL OF FAST BIPEDS (Tobias Luksch, Karsten Berns, Katja Mombaur and Gerrit Schultz)

11:00 – 11:20
POSTURAL STABILITY CONTROL FOR ROBOT-HUMAN COOPERATION FOR SIT-TO-STAND ASSISTANCE (Viviane Pasqui, Ludovic Saintbauzel and Philippe Bidaud)

11:20 – 11:40
TRAJECTORY GENERATOR FOR RHYTHMIC MOTION CONTROL OF ROBOT USING NEURAL OSCILLATORS
(Weiwei Huang, Chee-Meng Chew, Geok-Soon Hong and Nithya Gnanassegarane)

11:40 – 12:00
LEG CONTROL FOR CHANGING LOCOMOTION BETWEEN LEG-TYPE AND WHEEL-TYPE BASED ON EFFECTIVE USE OF TOTAL POWER
(Tokuji Okada, Wagner Tanaka Botelho and Toshimi Shimizu)

12:00 – 12:20
A BASIC VARIABLES SET BASED SCHEME OF ONLINE MOTION PLANNING FOR HUMANOID ROBOTS (Wang Jian, Sheng Tao and Ma Hongxu)

12:20 – 12:40
OPTIMIZED ROBOT DURING ELEVATION OF AN OBJECT: COMPARISON KNEE BENDING IMPRESSION (Hamed Ajabi Naeini and Mostafa Rostami)

10:00 – 12:40
T12 Session: Supporting Technologies (2)
Venue: Venus III
Session Chair: Gurvinder Virk

10:00 – 10:20
THE IMPROVEMENT OF STRUCTURAL AND REAL TIME CONTROL PERFORMANCES FOR MERO MODULAR WALKING ROBOTS
(Ion Ion, Luige Vladareanu, Radu Munteanu jr. and Mihai Munteanu)

10:20 – 10:40
IMPROVING PNEUMATIC CYLINDER PERFORMANCE FOR LEGGED ROBOTICS
(Graham McLatchey and John Billingsley)

10:40 – 11:00
INTEGRATED INTELLIGENT MECHROBOT SYSTEM
(Liqiong Tang and Gurvinder Singh Virk)

11:00 – 11:20
MOTION ESTIMATION AND SELF-LOCALIZATION BASED ON COMPUTER VISION AND ARTIFICIAL MARKER DEPOSITION
(Savan Chaniyara, Kaspar Althoefer and Lakmald Seneviratne)

11:20 – 11:40
SOFTWARE AND COMMUNICATION INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN OF THE HUMANOID ROBOT RH-1 (Dmitry Kaynov, Mario Arbulu, Pavel Staroverov, Luis Cabas and Carlos Balaguer)

11:40 – 12:00
SPRING-ORTHOSIS ASSISTED FES-CYCLING
(Rasha Massoud, Osman Tokhi and Shafiul Alam)

12:00 – 12:20
HIL/SIL BY DEVELOPMENT OF CLAWAR
(Sergiy Dzhantimirov, Frank Palis, Ulrich Schmucker, Andriy Telesh and Yuriy Zavgorodniy)

12:20 – 12:40
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF MICRO-GRIPPING DEVICES FOR MANIPULATION OF MICRO-PARTS
(Z.W. Zhong, S.K. Nah and S.H. Tan)\

12:40 – 13:45
Lunch
(Venus II)

Tuesday, 17 July, Afternoon

13:45 – 14:30
Exhibition
(Foyer)

14:30 – 15:00
Tea Break

15:00 – 17:40
T21 Session: Climbing Robots (3)
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Philippe Bidaud

15:00 – 15:20
STABILITY AND GAIT OPTIMIZATION OF A HYBRID LEGGED-WHEELED ROVER
(Byron Johns and Ayanna Howard)

15:20 – 15:40
DEVELOPMENT OF A SEALING SYSTEM FOR A CLIMBING ROBOT WITH UNDERPRESSURE ADHESION (Carsten Hillenbrand, Daniel Schmidt, Karsten Berns, Tim Leichner, Tobias Gastauer and Bernd Sauer)

15:40 – 16:00
AUTONOMOUS CLIMBING MOTIONS FOR CONNECTED CRAWLER ROBOTS
(Sho Yokota, Yasuhiro Ohyama, Hiroshi Hashimoto, Jin-Hua She, Kuniaki Kawabata, Hisato Koabayashi and Pierre Blazevic)

16:00 – 16:20
AN EVOLVED NEURAL NETWORK FOR FAST QUADRUPEDAL LOCOMOTION
(Irene Markelic and Keyan Zahedi)

16:20 – 16:40
DEVELOPMENT OF AN OMNI-DIRECTIONAL MOBILE ROBOT BASED ON SNAIL LOCOMOTION (kuniaki satou and Taro Nakamura)

16:40 – 17:00
ROBOT FOR MOTION IN TUBE
(Jatsun Sergey, Mishenko Vladimir and Jatsun Andrey)

17:00 – 17:20
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A ROPE CLIMBING ROBOT
(Juan Pablo Martínez Esponda)

17:20 – 17:40
DEVELOPMENT OF A SUCTION TYPE MINIATURE CLIMBING ROBOT WITH MINIMAL ACTUATORS
(Muthu veerappan Vignesh)

15:00 – 17:40
T22 Session: Supporting Technologies (3)
Venue: Venus II
Session Chair: Heinz Woem

15:00 – 15:20
IN SEARCH OF PRINCIPLES OF ODOUR SOURCE LOCALISATION
(Endre Kadar, Gurvinder Virk and Christodoulos Lytridis)

15:20 – 15:40
MCA2 – AN EXTENSIBLE MODULAR FRAMEWORK FOR ROBOT CONTROL APPLICATIONS
(Klaus Uhl and Marco Ziegenmeyer)

15:40 – 16:00
REAL-TIME COMPUTATIONAL COMPLEXITY OF THE ALGORITHMS FOR A SINGLE LINK MANIPULATOR SYSTEM
(M A Hossain, N H Siddique, M O Tokhi and M S Alam)

16:00 – 16:20
CONTROLLING AN ACTIVELY ARTICULATED SUSPENSION VEHICLE FOR MOBILITY IN ROUGH TERRAIN
(Siddharth Sanan, Sartaj Singh and Krishna K Madhava)

16:20 – 16:40
NEW STANDARDS FOR NEW ROBOTS
(Gurvinder Singh Virk)

16:40 – 17:00
CONTACT PROCESSING IN THE SIMULATION OF CLAWAR
(Ulrich Schmucker, Vadym Rusin, Mykhaylo Konyev and Tamas Juhasz)

17:00 – 17:20
A BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED ARCHITECTURE FOR CONTROL OF GRASPING MOVEMENTS OF AN ANTHROPOMORPHIC GRIPPER (Sergio Varona Moya, Javier Molina Vilaplana, Alejandro Linares Barranco, Jorge Juan Feliu Battle and Juan Lopez Coronado)

17:20 – 17:40
A CONCURRENT PLANNING ALGORITHM FOR DUAL-ARM SYSTEMS
(CHIEN-CHOU LIN, JEN-HUI CHUANG and TING-WEI CHAN)

18:30 – 20:30
Awards Banquet
Venus Ballroom

Wednesday, 18 July, Morning

8:30 – 8:45
Briefing by CLAWAR Association
Venus I

8:45 – 9:30
Plenary Talk 3: From Micro to Nano and Swarm Robots
Speaker: Professor Heinz Woen
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Jean-Guy Fontaine

9:30 – 10:00
Tea Break

10:00 – 12:40
W11 Session: Walking Robots (3)
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Jean-Guy Fontaine

10:00 – 10:20
A SELF-ADJUSTING UNIVERSAL JOINT CONTROLLER FOR STANDING AND WALKING LEGS
(Axel Schneider, Björn Fischer, Holk Cruse and Josef Schmitz)

10:20 – 10:40
AUTONOMOUS BIPEDAL GAIT ADJUSTMENT UNDER PERTURBATIONS
(Lin Yang, Chee-Meng Chew and Aun-Neow Poo)

10:40 – 11:00

STIFFNESS AND DUTY FACTOR MODELS FOR THE DESIGN OF RUNNING BIPED
(Muhammad E. Abdallah and Kenneth J. Waldron)

11:00 – 11:20
GAIN PROPERTY FOR BIPED WALKING VIA LEG LENGTH VARIATION (Tetsuya Kinugasa, Shoichi Miwa, Yannick Aoustin and Christine Chevallereau)

11:20 – 11:40
ROTOPOD: A NOVEL APPROACH TO EFFICIENT LEGGED LOCOMOTION
(Damian Lyons)

11:40 – 12:00
FOOT PLANNING MOTION OF HUMANOID ROBOT RH-1 USING LAG ALGORITHM
(Mario Arbulu, Luis Cabas, Pavel Staroverov, Dmitry Kaynov, Carlos Perez and Carlos Balaguer)

12:00 – 12:20
THE DESIGN OF A HUMANOIDAL BIPED FOR THE RESEARCH ON THE GAIT PATTERN GENERATORS
(Przemyslaw Kryczka and Chee-Meng Chew)

12:20 – 12:40
OBSERVER-BASED CONTROL OF A WALKING BIPED ROBOT: STABILITY ANALYSIS
(Vincent Lebastard, Yannick Aoustin and Franck Plestan)

12:40 – 13:45
Lunch
(Venus II)

 

Wednesday, 18 July, Afternoon

13:45 – 14:30
Plenary Talk 4: Climbing Robots for Nondestructive Testing: Historical Perspective and Future Trends
Speaker: Professor Bryan Bridge
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Ming Xie

14:30 – 15:00
Tea Break

15:00 – 16:40
W21 Session: Humanoid Soccer Robots
Venue: Venus I
Session Chair: Zhou Changjiu

15:00 – 15:20
A DISTRIBUTED EMBEDDED CONTROL ARCHITECTURE FOR HUMANOID SOCCER ROBOTS
Carlos Antonio Calderon, Changjiu Zhou, Pik Kong Yue, Mike Wong and Mohan Rajesh Elara

15:20 – 15:40
DESIGN OF A HUMANOID SOCCER ROBOT: WUKONG
Qing Tang, Rong Xiong, Jian Chu and Xinfeng Du

15:40 – 16:00
FORMULATION OF DESIRED ZERO MOMENT POINT TRJECTORY USING STATISTICAL METHOD
Lingyun Hu, Changjiu Zhou, Bi Wu and Tianwu Yang

16:00 – 16:20
LOCOMOTION CONTROL SCHEME FOR FAST WALKING HUMANOID SOCCER ROBOT
Weerayut Sawasdee, Pasan Kulvanit and Thavida Maneewarn

16:20 – 16:40
OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE OF THE FAST WALKING HUMANOID SOCCER ROBOT: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY
Pasan Kulvanit, Bantoon Srisuwan and Djitt Laowattana

15:00 – 16:40
W22 Session: Supporting Technologies (4)
Venue: Venus III
Session Chair: Yu Haoyong

15:00 – 15:20
HIDDEN MARKOV MODEL BASED FUZZY CONTROLLER FOR FLEXIBLE-LINK MANIPULATOR
(M.N.H. Siddique, M.A. Hossain, M.S. Alam and M.O. Tokhi)

15:20 – 15:40
A NOVEL MINIATURE ATTITUDE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR CLIMBING AND WALKING ROBOTS
(Guanglong Wang, Chunxi Zhang, Zhaoying Zhou and Rong Zhu)

15:40 – 16:00
ASYNCHRONOUS LOCAL POSITIONING SYSTEM BASED ON ULTRASONIC ACTIVE BEACONS AND FEED FORWARD NEURAL NETWORKS
(Pablo Estevez, Juan Hernandez, Jose Cappelletto and Juan Carlos Grieco)

16:00 – 16:20
A SELF ORGANIZING NETWORK MODEL FOR CLAWAR SYSTEM COMMUNICATION COEVOLUTION
(Fabio P. Bonsignorio)

16:20 – 16:40
WALKER SYSTEM WITH ASSISTANCE DEVICE FOR STANDING-UP
(Daisuke Chugo, Wataru Matsuoka and Kunikatsu Takase)

16:40 – 17:40
Farewell Reception
(Foyer)

 

 


Proceedings Book (World Scientific Publisher) :

 

Advances and Techniques in Climbing and Walking Robots

Ming Xie
Nanyang Technological University, SG

Steven Dubowsky
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Jean-Guy Fontaine
Italian Institute of Technology, Italy

M. Osman Tokhi
University of Sheffield, UK

Gurvinder S. Virk
University of Massey, NZ

Table of Contents

Preface

Part I: Plenary Introduction

Chapter 1
Bipedal Humanoid Robot and Its Applications
Atsuo Takanishi

Chapter 2
Climbing up the Wall
John Billingsley,

Chapter 3
From Micro to Nano and Swarm Robots
Heinz Wörn

Chapter 4
Climbing Robots for Nondestructive Testing: Historical Perspective and Future Trends
Bryan Bridge

Chapter 5
Biomechanics and Robotics
Neville Hogan

Part II: Advances in Climbing Robots:

Chapter 1
A CPG WITH FORCE FEEDBACK FOR A STATICALLY STABLE QUADRUPED GAIT
Jose Cappelletto, Pablo Estevez, Gerardo Fernandez-Lopez and Juan
Carlos Grieco

Chapter 3
A SLIDING SOCK LOCOMOTION MODULE FOR A RESCUE ROBOT
Luca Rimassa, Matteo Zoppi and Rezia Molfino

Chapter 4
A WHEELED WALL-CLIMBING ROBOT WITH TWO CLIMBING LEGS
Zhihai Li, Yili Fu, Hejin Yang and Shuguo Wang

Chapter 5
AN EVOLVED NEURAL NETWORK FOR FAST QUADRUPEDAL LOCOMOTION
Irene Markelic and Keyan Zahedi

Chapter 6
AUTONOMOUS CLIMBING MOTIONS FOR CONNECTED CRAWLER ROBOTS
Sho Yokota, Yasuhiro Ohyama, Hiroshi Hashimoto, Jin-Hua She, Kuniaki
Kawabata, Hisato Koabayashi and Pierre Blazevic

Chapter 7
CONTROLLING AN ACTIVELY ARTICULATED SUSPENSION VEHICLE FOR MOBILITY IN ROUGH TERRAIN
Siddharth Sanan, Sartaj Singh and Krishna K Madhava

Chapter 8
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A ROPE CLIMBING ROBOT
Juan Pablo Martínez Esponda

Chapter 9
DESIGN OF A NEW LEG MECHANISM FOR THE WHEELED WALL CLIMBING ROBOT
Hejin Yang, Yili Fu, Zhihai Li and Shuguo Wang

Chapter 10
DEVELOPMENT OF A CLIMBING ROBOT FOR WELD INSPECTION
Jianzhong Shang, Bryan Bridge, Tariq Sattar, Shymal Mondal and Alina
Brenner

Chapter 11
DEVELOPMENT OF A SEALING SYSTEM FOR A CLIMBING ROBOT WITH UNDERPRESSURE ADHESION
Carsten Hillenbrand, Daniel Schmidt, Karsten Berns, Tim Leichner,
Tobias Gastauer and Bernd Sauer

Chapter 12
DEVELOPMENT OF A SUCTION TYPE MINIATURE CLIMBING ROBOT WITH MINIMAL ACTUATORS
Muthu veerappan Vignesh

Chapter 13
DEVELOPMENT OF AN AMPHIBIOUS HEXAPOD ROBOT BASED ON A WATER STRIDER
Soh Fujii and Taro Nakamura

Chapter 14
DEVELOPMENT OF AN OMNI-DIRECTIONAL MOBILE ROBOT BASED ON SNAIL LOCOMOTION
kuniaki satou and Taro Nakamura

Chapter 15
GAIT PARAMETER ADAPTATION TO ENVIRONMENTAL PERTURBATIONS IN QUADRUPEDAL ROBOTS
Elena Garcia, Joaquin Estremera, Pablo Gonzalez de Santos and Manuel Armada

Chapter 16
INTELLIGENT SPIDER WALKING ROBOT FOR ROUGH TERRAIN
Michael McCready, Liqiong Tang and Gurvinder Singh Virk

Chapter 17
KINEMATICS, SENSORS AND CONTROL OF THE FULLY AUTOMATED FACADE CLEANING ROBOT SIRIUSC FOR THE FRAUNHOFER HEADQUARTERS BUILDUNG, MUNICH
Norbert Elkmann, Mario Lucke, Tino Krüger and Thomas Stürze

Chapter 18
ON FOUR LEGS TOWARDS FLEXIBLE AND FAST LOCOMOTION
Cem Kara, Christian Heckhoff, Thorsten Brandt and Dieter Schramm

Chapter 19
ON THE DESIGN OF A FOUR-BAR MECHANISM FOR OBSTACLES CLIMBING WHEELS
Antonio González, Erika Ottaviano and Marco Ceccarelli

Chapter 20
PATH PLANNING FOR THE “3DCLIMBER”
Mahmoud Tavakoli, Lino Marques and Aníbal T. de Almeida

Chapter 22
ROBOT FOR MOTION IN TUBE
Jatsun Sergey, Mishenko Vladimir and Jatsun Andrey

Chapter 23
ROBOTRAIN AS SNAKELIKE ROBOTIC SYSTEM WITH MINIMAL NUMBER OF DOF
Vladimir Pavlovsky, Natalia Petrovskaya, Vladimir Evgrafov and Vladimir Pavlovsky, Jr

Chapter 24
SERVICING SOLAR POWER PLANTS WITH WALLWALKER
Ridha Azaiz

Chapter 25
STABILITY AND GAIT OPTIMIZATION OF A HYBRID LEGGED-WHEELED ROVER
Byron Johns and Ayanna Howard

Chapter 27
TERRAIN-ADAPTIVE LOCOMOTION OF A WHEEL-LEGGED SERVICE ROBOT USING
ACTUATOR-BASED FORCE MEASUREMENTS
Petri Virekoski and Ilkka Leppänen

Chapter 28
THE CONTROL OF QUADRUPED WALKING ROBOT BASED ON BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED
APPROACH
Choi Hyouk Ryeol, Kang Tae Hun, Koo Ig Mo and Song Young Kuk

Chapter 29
THE IMPROVEMENT OF STRUCTURAL AND REAL TIME CONTROL PERFORMANCES FOR
MERO MODULAR WALKING ROBOTS
Ion Ion, Luige Vladareanu, Radu Munteanu jr. and Mihai Munteanu

 

Part III: Advances in Walking Robots:

Chapter 1
A BASIC VARIABLES SET BASED SCHEME OF ONLINE MOTION PLANNING FOR HUMANOID ROBOTS
Wang Jian, Sheng Tao and Ma Hongxu

Chapter 2
A HOPPING MOBILITY CONCEPT FOR A ROUGH TERRAIN SEARCH AND RESCUE ROBOT
Steven Dubowsky, Jean-Sebastien Plante, Sam Kesner and Penny Boston

Chapter 3
A PROPOSAL FOR BIPEDAL LOCOMOTION USING GYROSCOPIC EFFECT
Pulkit Kapur, Rahul Mukhi and Vinayak

Chapter 4
A SELF-ADJUSTING UNIVERSAL JOINT CONTROLLER FOR STANDING AND WALKING LEGS
Axel Schneider, Björn Fischer, Holk Cruse and Josef Schmitz

Chapter 5
A STEP TOWARDS PNEUMATICALLY ACTUATED BIPED LOCOMOTION : A BIO INSPIRED PLATFORM FOR STIFFNESS CONTROL
Giovanni Muscato and Giacomo Spampinato

Chapter 6
AUTONOMOUS BIPEDAL GAIT ADJUSTMENT UNDER PERTURBATIONS
Lin Yang, Chee-Meng Chew and Aun-Neow Poo

Chapter 7
DESIGN AND PROBLEMS OF A NEW LEG-WHEEL WALKING ROBOT
Cristina Tavolieri, Erica Ottaviano, Marco Ceccarelli and Andrea Nardelli

Chapter 8
STIFFNESS AND DUTY FACTOR MODELS FOR THE DESIGN OF RUNNING BIPEDS
Muhammad E. Abdallah and Kenneth J. Waldron

Chapter 10
CONSTRAINT BASED TRAJECTORY SIMPLIFICATION OF FULL BODY TRAJECTORIES FOR A WALKING ROBOT
Hanns Tappeiner and Alfred Rizzi

Chapter 11
FOOT PLANNING MOTION OF HUMANOID ROBOT RH-1 USING LAG ALGORITHM
Mario Arbulu, Luis Cabas, Pavel Staroverov, Dmitry Kaynov, Carlos Perez
and Carlos Balaguer

Chapter 12
GAIN PROPERTY FOR BIPED WALKING VIA LEG LENGTH VARIATION
Tetsuya Kinugasa, Shoichi Miwa, Yannick Aoustin and Christine Chevallereau

Chapter 13
LEG CONTROL FOR CHANGING LOCOMOTION BETWEEN LEG-TYPE AND WHEEL-TYPE BASED ON EFFECTIVE USE OF TOTAL POWER
Tokuji Okada, Wagner Tanaka Botelho and Toshimi Shimizu

Chapter 14
MOVEMENT SIMULATION FOR MERO MODULAR WALKING ROBOT
Ion Ion, Ion Simionescu, Adrian Curaj and Alexandru Marin

Chapter 15
TRAJECTORY GENERATOR FOR RHYTHMIC MOTION CONTROL OF ROBOT USING NEURAL OSCILLATORS
Weiwei Huang, Chee-Meng Chew, Geok-Soon Hong and Nithya Gnanassegarane

Chapter 16
OBSERVER-BASED CONTROL OF A WALKING BIPED ROBOT: STABILITY ANALYSIS
Vincent Lebastard, Yannick Aoustin and Franck Plestan

Chapter 17
OPTIMIZED ROBOT DURING ELEVATION OF AN OBJECT: COMPARISON KNEE BENDING IMPRESSION
Hamed Ajabi Naeini and Mostafa Rostami

Chapter 18
POSTURAL STABILITY CONTROL FOR ROBOT-HUMAN COOPERATION FOR SIT-TO-STAND ASSISTANCE
Viviane Pasqui, Ludovic Saintbauzel and Philippe Bidaud

Chapter 19
RESEARCH ON UNDERACTUATED DYNAMICAL WALKING OF 3D BIPED ROBOT
Sheng Tao and Ma Hongxu

Chapter 20
ROTOPOD: A NOVEL APPROACH TO EFFICIENT LEGGED LOCOMOTION
Damian Lyons

Chapter 21
THE DESIGN OF A HUMANOIDAL BIPED FOR THE RESEARCH ON THE GAIT PATTERN GENERATORS
Przemyslaw Kryczka and Chee-Meng Chew

Chapter 22
THINKING ABOUT BOUNDING AND GALLOPING USING SIMPLE MODELS
Kenneth Waldron, Joaquin Estremera, Paul Csonka and Surya Singh

Chapter 23
USING OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES FOR THE DESIGN AND CONTROL OF FAST BIPEDS
Tobias Luksch, Karsten Berns, Katja Mombaur and Gerrit Schultz

Chapter 24
USING VIRTUAL MODEL CONTROL AND GENETIC ALGORITHM TO OBTAIN STABLE BIPEDAL WALKING GAIT THROUGH OPTIMIZING THE ANKLE TORQUE
Van-Huan Dau, Chee-Meng Chew and Aun-Neow Poo

Chapter 25
WALKER SYSTEM WITH ASSISTANCE DEVICE FOR STANDING-UP
Daisuke Chugo, Wataru Matsuoka and Kunikatsu Takase

 

Part IV: Advances in Humanoid Soccer Robots:

Chapter 1
A DISTRIBUTED EMBEDDED CONTROL ARCHITECTURE FOR HUMANOID SOCCER ROBOTS
Carlos Antonio Calderon, Changjiu Zhou, Pik Kong Yue, Mike Wong and Mohan Rajesh Elara

Chapter 2
DESIGN OF A HUMANOID SOCCER ROBOT: WUKONG
Qing Tang, Rong Xiong, Jian Chu and Xinfeng Du

Chapter 3
FORMULATION OF DESIRED ZERO MOMENT POINT TRJECTORY USING STATISTICAL METHOD
Lingyun Hu, Changjiu Zhou, Bi Wu and Tianwu Yang

Chapter 4
LOCOMOTION CONTROL SCHEME FOR FAST WALKING HUMANOID SOCCER ROBOT
Weerayut Sawasdee, Pasan Kulvanit and Thavida Maneewarn

Chapter 5
OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE OF THE FAST WALKING HUMANOID SOCCER ROBOT: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY
Pasan Kulvanit, Bantoon Srisuwan and Djitt Laowattana

 

Part V: Supporting Technologies

Chapter 1
A BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED ARCHITECTURE FOR CONTROL OF GRASPING MOVEMENTS OF AN ANTHROPOMORPHIC GRIPPER
Sergio Varona Moya, Javier Molina Vilaplana, Alejandro Linares Barranco, Jorge Juan Feliu Battle and Juan Lopez Coronado

Chapter 2
A CONCURRENT PLANNING ALGORITHM FOR DUAL-ARM SYSTEMS
CHIEN-CHOU LIN, JEN-HUI CHUANG and TING-WEI CHAN

Chapter 4
A MODULAR APPROACH FOR CONTROLLING MOBILE ROBOTS
Kristian Regenstein, Thilo Kerscher, Clemens Birkenhofer, Tamim Asfour,
J. Marius Zöllner and Rüdiger Dillmann

Chapter 5
A SELF ORGANIZING NETWORK MODEL FOR CLAWAR SYSTEM COMMUNICATION COEVOLUTION
Fabio P. Bonsignorio

Chapter 6
AN APPROACH TO GLOBAL LOCALIZATION PROBLEM USING MEAN SHIFT ALGORITHM
Giovanni Muscato and Salvatore Sessa

Chapter 8
ASYNCHRONOUS LOCAL POSITIONING SYSTEM BASED ON ULTRASONIC ACTIVE BEACONS AND FEED FORWARD NEURAL NETWORKS
Pablo Estevez, Juan Hernandez, Jose Cappelletto and Juan Carlos Grieco

Chapter 9
CONTACT PROCESSING IN THE SIMULATION OF CLAWAR
Ulrich Schmucker, Vadym Rusin, Mykhaylo Konyev and Tamas Juhasz

Chapter 10
CREATING A GESTURE RECOGNITION SYSTEM BASED ON SHIRT SHAPES
Pavel Staroverov, Silvia Marcos, Dmtry Kaynov, Mario Arbulu, Luis Cabas and Carlos Balaguer

Chapter 11
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF MICRO-GRIPPING DEVICES FOR MANIPULATION OF MICRO-PARTS
Z.W. Zhong, S.K. Nah and S.H. Tan

Chapter 12
DESIGNING OF A COMMAND SHAPER USING MULTI-OBJECTIVE PARTICLE SWARM ALGORITHM FOR VIBRATION CONTROL OF A SINGLE-LINK FLEXIBLE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM
M. S. Alam, M. O. Tokhi and M. A. Hossain

Chapter 13
DETECTING SOUND SOURCES WITH THE HUMANOID ROBOT RH-1
Pavel Staroverov, Ricardo Martinez, Dmitry Kaynov, Mario Arbulu, Luis Cabas and Carlos Balaguer

Chapter 15
IN SEARCH OF PRINCIPLES OF ODOUR SOURCE LOCALISATION
Endre Kadar, Gurvinder Virk and Christodoulos Lytridis

Chapter 16
GA TUNED COLSED-LOOP CONTROL OF SPRING BRAKE ORTHOSIS
M S Huq, R Massoud, M S Alam and M O Tokhi

Chapter 17
HIDDEN MARKOV MODEL BASED FUZZY CONTROLLER FOR FLEXIBLE-LINK MANIPULATOR
M.N.H. Siddique, M.A. Hossain, M.S. Alam and M.O. Tokhi

Chapter 18
HIL/SIL BY DEVELOPMENT OF CLAWAR
Sergiy Dzhantimirov, Frank Palis, Ulrich Schmucker, Andriy Telesh and
Yuriy Zavgorodniy

Chapter 19
IMPROVING PNEUMATIC CYLINDER PERFORMANCE FOR LEGGED ROBOTICS
Graham McLatchey and John Billingsley

Chapter 21
INTEGRATED INTELLIGENT MECHROBOT SYSTEM
Liqiong Tang and Gurvinder Singh Virk

Chapter 22
MCA2 – AN EXTENSIBLE MODULAR FRAMEWORK FOR ROBOT CONTROL APPLICATIONS
Klaus Uhl and Marco Ziegenmeyer

Chapter 23
MOTION ESTIMATION AND SELF-LOCALIZATION BASED ON COMPUTER VISION AND ARTIFICIAL MARKER DEPOSITION
Savan Chaniyara, Kaspar Althoefer and Lakmald Seneviratne

Chapter 24
NEW STANDARDS FOR NEW ROBOTS
Gurvinder Singh Virk

Chapter 25
PARALLEL PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION FOR NETWORKED CLAWAR SYSTEM COOPERATION
Fabio P. Bonsignorio

Chapter 26
PERFORMANCE METRICES FOR IMPROVING HRI
Yiannis Gatsoulis and Gurvinder Singh Virk

Chapter 28
REAL-TIME COMPUTATIONAL COMPLEXITY OF THE ALGORITHMS FOR A SINGLE LINK MANIPULATOR SYSTEM
M A Hossain, N H Siddique, M O Tokhi and M S Alam

Chapter 30
SOFTWARE AND COMMUNICATION INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN OF THE HUMANOID ROBOT RH-1
Dmitry Kaynov, Mario Arbulu, Pavel Staroverov, Luis Cabas and Carlos
Balaguer

Chapter 31
SPARBOT – A ROBOTIC FOCUS MITT TRAINING PLATFORM
Richard Stokes, Liqiong Tang and Ibrahim A. Al-Bahadly

Chapter 32
SPRING-ORTHOSIS ASSISTED FES-CYCLING
Rasha Massoud, Osman Tokhi and Shafiul Alam

Chapter 34
A NOVEL MINIATURE ATTITUDE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR CLIMBING AND WALKING ROBOTS
Guanglong Wang, Chunxi Zhang, Zhaoying Zhou and Rong Zhu



 

 

Call for Exhibitions

The conference venue provides 9 booths for exhibitors to showcase their products, prototypes, and publications. The layout of exhibition area is shown below:

AREA

For interested exhibitors, please complete and submit the Exhibition Registration form in order to reserve a booth.


 

Conference Registration

Please fill up the ExhibitorRegistrationForm in BLOCK LETTERS and fax the completed form (or email the scanned copy of the completed form) to the CLAWAR2007’s Secretariat Office at: +65 6774 2911.

Please take note that:

  • For an accepted paper to be included in the conference proceedings, at least one author must register.
  • A maximum of 2 papers are allowed for each registration.
  • The registration fee covers one copy of the book of proceedings (to be published by the World Scientific Publishing Co.), attendance to all technical sessions, reception, tea/coffee breaks, luncheons and conference banquet. Additional banquet tickets can be purchased at the subsidized rate of S$100 per ticket.
  • Students must provide an official letter confirming their status as full-time students.
  • Registration will be confirmed after receiving the full payment.

Exhibition Registration

For interested exhibitors, please complete and submit the Exhibition Registration Form in order to reserve a booth (see the webpage on Exhibition).


 

About Singapore:

Situated at one of the most important crossroads of the world, Singapore is truly a place where East and West come together. The Republic’s geographical location (between latitudes 1°09’N & 1°29’N and longitudes 103°38’E & 104°05’E) has long been instrumental in Singapore’s growth as an important centre in trade, tourism and communications.

 

Climate:

Singapore has a mild tropical climate throughout the year. Temperatures reach a maximum of 32-33°C during the day, falling to a pleasant 23-25°C during evening hours. Relative humidity often exceeds 90 percent at night and in early hours of the morning shortly before sunrise. On dry afternoons it is usually between 60 and 70 percent. Rainfall is most abundant during the Northeast Monsoon season from November to January. Much of the rain falls in sudden showers.

 

What to wear:

The climate encourages informal dressing and few places require a jacket and tie for gentlemen. Visitors should bring the lightest of summer wear. For men, open-necked shirts and lightweight tropical slacks are ideal. For formal functions, lounge suites for gentlemen are also recommended. Lightweight summer dresses, slacks and tops will be suitable for day wear for ladies. All hotels and shopping centres are air-conditioned, so a long sleeve shirt for men and a light wrap for ladies is advisable, especially in the evening.

 

Population and Languages:

In Singapore, you will find Chinese, Indian, Malay and Eurasian Communities living harmoniously together, their long established cultures forming a unique backdrop to a clean and modern garden city. There are four official languages: English, Malay, Mandarin and Tamil. English is spoken everywhere and it is the common business language of all.

 

Transportation:

Public transportation, including buses and the MRT (Mass Rapid Transit) system provides access for visitors to most areas of the island. You can buy a Transit-Link card, which can be used on the MRT and buses.

There are many taxis, which can be hired from the taxi stands, roadside or booking by telephone. A booking fee is usually charged when hired by telephone. There is also a surcharge for trips starting from the Changi Airport. You may wish to take the Airport Shuttle to almost all hotels within the city from Changi Airport. The operating hours and fares of the shuttle service can be obtained at the airport shuttle counters located at the arrival hall of Changi Aiport Terminal 1 and 2. Payment is made to the driver who will accept cash, major credit cards and charge cards.

 

Currency:

The unit of currency is the Singapore dollar. (US$1.00 = Approx. S$1.65)

 

Credit/Charge Card:

Credit cards are widely accepted in Singapore. Hotels, retailers, restaurants, travel agents and even some taxis readily accept international credit cards.

 

Food & Shopping:

Singapore is the culinary capital of Southeast Asia, and eating out in Singapore is an experience few will forget. You can eat out at open-air food stalls or dine in the plushest of restaurants at world-class hotels. In terms of sheer variety, Singapore probably has no rival. Singapore’s immigrant population and visitors from all over the world have brought a staggering array of cuisine and cooking skills as well as having created unique blends of their own.

Hawker centers and traditional coffee shop dishes rarely cost more than S$3 to S$4 each whereas dishes sold at food courts (air-conditioned and usually located at shopping centers are slightly more expensive). A meal and a soft drink in a fast food outlet cost S$4 to S$7, whereas restaurants can cost anything from S$10 to S$120 per person, depending upon where you dine and what you order. Tipping is not expected in any of Singapore’s food or entertainment outlets. Most establishments will add to your bill a 10% service charge, a Good Services Tax (GST) of 3% and in most establishments, a 1% cess tax. Additional tipping is at your discretion.

Singapore was founded on the principle of free trade, and even today, most goods are sold duty-free. An endless range of goods from all over the world is available at prices that are often lower than those in the country of manufacture. Air-conditioned shopping complexes, department stores, emporiums and shopping arcades allow visitors to shop in comfort. Most of these places stay open till 9.30pm daily.

 

Travel Documents:

Visitors must have passport valid for three months from the time of arrival. Visas are not required for a stay of up to 14 days for Commonwealth citizens, British passport holders and citizens of the Republic of Ireland. As regulations may change from time to time, visitors should check the latest visa requirements from the Singapore Overseas Mission in your country or may refer to the web page of Singapore Immigration at

http://www.mha.gov.sg/sir/travel_tips/visareqs.html.

 

Electricity:

Singapore ’s voltage for electricity is 220 – 240 volts AC, 50 cycles per second.

 

Tourist Information:

For more information, please visit the Singapore On-Line Guide: http://www.travel.com.sg/sog

 

Useful Phone Numbers:

Police 999 (no charge)

Ambulance / Fire Brigade – Emergency 995 (no charge)

Ambulance – Non-Emergency 1777

 

Taxi Service (24 hours) Call Numbers: 6552-1111, 6481-1211, or 6553-3880

Singapore Tourism Board (STB): 6736-6622

Website http://www.stb.com.sg/

Automobile Association of Singapore: 6737-2444

AA Road Service (24 hours): 6748-9911

International Calls: 104

 

Uniquely Singapore:

Unique is the word that best captures Singapore– a dynamic, cosmopolitan city-state where different cultures, ethnic groups and religions blend harmoniously. A bridge between the East and the West for centuries, Singapore, located in the heart of fascinating Southeast Asia, continues to embrace tradition and modernity today.

Brimming with unbridled energy and bursting with exciting events, the city-state offers countless unique memorable experiences waiting to be discovered. Only in Singapore can you

  • Feast around the clock and savour mouth-watering dishes not found anywhere else, with settings ranging from a cable car to a riverboat along the Singapore River…

  • Get your hands on the latest buys from luxury labels or shop for basement bargains at 4am in the morning….

  • Have breakfast with an orang utan, learn about the Chinese tea ceremony and watch a Broadway musical all in one day…

  • Get catapulted 60 metres into the air on a reverse bungy ride or board an amphibious “duck” to explore the city…

  • Dive with sharks, get up close and personal with cheetahs or enjoy a high-tea buffet 70 storeys in the air…

  • Luxuriate in a garden spa a stone’s throw from the best business facilities in the world…

  • Take a step back in time and visit a Chinese temple, Muslim mosque, Hindu temple and Christian church all in one neighbourhood…

  • Mingle with local youths along Orchard Road and pick up the latest fashion tips and amusing local catch phrases…

 

Singapore – truly a city like no other. With its friendly and welcoming people, state-of-the-art infrastructure and something new happening every day, Singapore is so easy to appreciate. Come and discover countless unique experiences, and take away memories that are uniquely Singapore.


Venue:

 

venue-hotel_clip_image001

venue-hotel_clip_image003

The conference will be held in the Venus ballroom at level 3 of the Furama Riverfront Hotel.

Hotels:

 

 

 

We recommend that the delegates choose either the Furama Riverfront Hotel or the Grand Copthorne Waterfront Hotel. These two hotels are separated by a street. You can reach these two hotels from the Changi International Airport by taxi. The trip by taxi will cost about US$12.

It is worth noting that both hotels provide complimentary shuttle service to other shopping locations in the downtown area. Such service is operating hourly on everyday.

 

venue-hotel_clip_image001

venue-hotel_clip_image004

 

 

 

For CLAWAR2007 Delegates:

Deluxe Room: S$184 nett

Executive Room: S$238 nett

(the price is inclusive of breakfast)

For reservation, please complete and submit thisbooking form.

For more detail, visit the hotel’s website.

logo_copthorne

venue-hotel_clip_image008

 

 

 

 

For CLAWAR2007 Delegates:

Superior Room: S$185+++

Superior Plus Room: S$215+++

For reservation and more detail, please visit the hotel’s website.

 

 



Paper Submission Link: ttp://www.softconf.com/start/clawar07/

Ming Xie

General Chair

Nanyang Technological University

Singapore

mmxie@ntu.edu.sg

M. Osman Tokhi

Program Chair

University of Sheffield

UK

O.Tokhi@sheffield.ac.ukSteven Dubowsky

General Co-Chair

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

USA

dubowsky@mit.edu

Gurvinder S. Virk

Program Co-Chair

University of Leeds

UK

gsvirk@clawar.orgJean-Guy Fontaine

General Co-Chair

Italian Institute of Technology

Italy

Jean-guy.fontaine@iit.it

Shirley, Soh Wei Ling

Conference Secretariat Office

CCE, Nanyang Technological University

Singapore

clawar2007@ntu.edu.sg


Important Dates

Extended Abstracts, or Full Papers: 15 January 2007

Paper Acceptance: 15 March 2007

Submission of Final Papers: 15 May 2007

Early Bird Registration: 15 May 2007

Preliminary Program: 15 June 2007

Conference: 16-18 July 2007


Sponsors

Singapore Tourism Board us_fireworksstb

CLAWAR Association Clawar_Association_Logo_small

Nanyang Technological University NTU-LOGO

DSO National Laboratories dsologo

International Journal of Humanoid Robotics ijhr_small

International Journal of Industrial Robot ir-cover-xix